5 Reasons why Alcoholics Anonymous sucks

There’s a large grey area between moderate drinking and an alcohol problem. But not for Alcoholics Anonymous.

Here’s a post about a hideous cult called Alcoholics Anonymous. This organization that says it wants to help people with problems is a real wolf in sheep’s clothes. We would never deny that alcohol can contribute in the destruction of people’s lives, but in most cases people are just made to believe they have an alcohol problem by the same group that claims they can help them. AA is a cancer that runs through modern society. We once mentioned them in our post of the 7 modern supervillains, but it’s high time we go a little deeper. Time to show how dirty Alcoholics Anonymous really operates with 5 easy points.

1. AA tells you that you are powerless over alcohol
From the first time someone joins Alcoholics Anonymous this person is forced to lie to him- or herself. The first step of the AA program is to admit you are powerless over alcohol and your life has become unmanageable. This is of course the biggest bullshit. Just because you have no control over your drinking and life got out of hand, doesn’t mean you can’t learn how to get control again. Instead of giving you handy tips of how to manage your life better, you are told that you have a horrible disease. Besides the fact that this is highly confronting and depressing for most people it’s also very much untrue. The main reason heavy drinkers slip away is because societies can be extremely judgemental. One can be talented, social and skillful, but still be labeled an alcoholic and end up isolated and depressed. So don’t call them powerless, for it’s all those other people who lack the power to look further than someone’s drinking habbits.

2. AA is a religious cult
According to Alcoholics Anonymous only a higher power can restore your sanity. And not just any deity, but the man who turned water into wine: Jesus Christ. No less than 5 of the 12 steps from the AA program are directly linked to Christian religion. That makes Alcoholics Anonymous a religious cult, that uses alcohol related problems as a tool to win souls for the church. Now there is nothing wrong with being a Christian or supporting other forms of religion, but let that be a decision made from the heart. Not because some jokers say you have a horrible disease that can only be cured by worshipping their god.

3. AA makes people quit completely
As a result of the statement that you are powerless over alcohol the only solution according to Alcoholics Anonymous is to stay completely abstinent for the rest of your life. Of course we are not going to advocate that people with 90% liver failure should continue binge drinking, but all kinds of people join AA. There is a huge grey area between moderate drinkers and raging alcoholics. People with a few cases of driving under the influence of alcohol, people who got into a drunken bar fight, people who got fired after the office Christmas party got out of hand. These people don’t need abstinence, they just need to learn to control their actions a bit better when they drink.

4. AA brainswashes people
The result of our first 3 points from this list is that people are completely brainwashed by Alcoholics Anonymous. They believe that their taste for booze is a horrible disease that they have no power over. In their little cult they hear each week how many days the other members have been “clean”. Which strengthens them in their belief that they too should stay completely abstinent. If they fail they feel like they dissapointed the rest of the group and of course God. Avoiding even a single sip of alcohol becomes an unhealthy obsession. No wonder so many people fall in even greater depressions or commit suicide when they have a little relapse.

5. AA turns people into missionaries
A very annoying side result is that members of Alcoholics Anonymous force their new beliefs onto other people, as they are told by the 12th and final step of the program. With that they are a great catalyst for the judgemental socities as described earlier. These AA missionaries keep the vicious circle that leads to more isolated and depressed people alive, and recruit new members for their hideous cult. Most people that are labeled as alcoholics are not sick mentally or physically and would function perfect in society if people just let them. Instead of making them stronger by teaching how to manage or control their vices, we do the opposite and tell them they are powerless. Great job AA.

Micky Bumbar

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25 thoughts on “5 Reasons why Alcoholics Anonymous sucks

  1. alcohol is a bad drug for too many witless souls out there who are oblivious to the danger they are posing for themselves and others. Yes, moderation is good for those with sensible judgement (not enough of those) but I would rather this organization continue to preach all they want. Thousands of lives are lost every year and if the preaching saves lives, I can overlook the flaws in their program.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mehhh it’s a shitty organization that isn’t slightly trying to help. No matter how bad someone’s addiction it’s never an excuse for complete brainwashing. Let the people be who they are. From there on you can try to help them develope themselves.
      Cheers,
      Micky

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      • Hi, Micky… And Cheers! In an ironic twist, I just moved into a new apartment and my porch looks across the street to an AA ‘club.’ So now I can sit and have a few cold ones while not quite feeling sorry for the schmucks who bought into the propaganda.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. We do not wish to go from one extreme to the other: from alcoholic to teetotaler. The first kills one; the second is often an impossibility. The wisdom to drink responsibly and moderately is more easier said than done.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well it’s worth aiming for. And in my opinion one doesn’t do that by starting off with the thought that you’re powerless and you have to lay your faith in God’s hands. People are a lot stronger than you think if you give them some credit and respect.
      Cheers,
      Micky

      Liked by 1 person

    • AA does not aim to brainwash anyone, it’s totally a voluntary fellowship where the only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. We don’t force that choice, you have to make that one yourself. We don’t label people alcoholics, you have to come to that conclusion yourself. Now if a person is homeless, jobless, list their family and more as a result of alcohol how can they not admit that they are powerless and their lives unmanageable? Many have been in those situations and now are not, do how can you sit at your computer and bash a fellowship that actually works and help where others wouldn’t? As far as God is concerned, there are many atheists in AA that are of great help, and religion isn’t forced on you but suggested that you find something greater than you to help you since you did such a great job on your own. It’s a personal choice but suggested. You also failed to mention that we do personal housecleaning of our wrong doings and people we’ve hurt or killed as a result of alcohol and how we help people cope and come to terms with them and even make amends where possible. Don’t trash a program that saves lives but rather does that don’t, will make you look better.

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      • Mehhhh it is a nice reply I’ll give you that. But I stand with my beliefs. It’s perfectly possible to function in society as a heavy drinker if people just let us.

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  3. I find your attack on AA irresponsible.
    If you’ve ever met people who are alcoholics then maybe you’d understand it is a very corrosive disease that not only afflicts the individual – but all those related to that individual.
    The AA is one of many organisations that help people in trouble.
    It has helped some of my family.
    Without the AA they may not have survived.

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    • Indeed sir. I consider myself a drinker, a drunkard or a Bohemian, but for sure no alcoholic. I think very few people are really powerless. But with an attitude like AA is preaching you’ll never gain any willpower.
      Cheers,
      Micky

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  4. AA is garbage but what would you expect from a religious organization trying to pose as a medical organization.
    There are already effective medical based alcoholism treatments such as the Sinclair Method.

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  5. I agree with you, Micky. For years I have labeled an “alcoholic” by people who love to judge others. Why? I work overnight, so I drink in their morning, my evening. They’d rather I drink when they do, which would be right before I go to work. Additionally, I drink alone (well, the dog is home…does that count?). That’s because the roommates are all at work. So to them, I’m an alcoholic, even though I’ve never list a job, had a DUI, etc. And yes, AA is a religious organization who insists that you are absolutely helpless to change your situation without “God.” I totally disagree with their agenda. Thank you for being a voice of rationality! Salud!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad to be of service Sean. Keep doing what you love. If you like to drink and you function well in society nobody has the right to judge you. If people have a problem with your drinking, maybe the problem lays with them cause they bow down to judgemental society and wish they had your strength to just do what you love no matter what others think. Maybe you should gather some drinkers and throw these poor souls an intervention for being party poopers.
      Cheers,
      Micky

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      • Cheers to you, Micky! You’re absolutely right. If they don’t like it, fúck ’em. Especially the roommate, lol…who is actually my ex-wife. When it comes to the good stuff, she’s like “nope, we’re roommates!” When it comes to criticizing or judging (which is as certain as sunrise), THEN she wants to pretend we have a real relationship, lol. Keep up the awesome work..and remember to always finish your drink, there are kids in Africa going without…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hahaha that’s some fucked up situation you got over there. But you also gave some solid advice. Will do mate.
        Cheers,
        Micky
        Micky

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  6. Stumbled across this somehow. While I respect your beliefs and your right to express them it’s obvious you haven’t done any real research or truly understand how AA works.

    To quote you:
    “It’s perfectly possible to function in society as a heavy drinker if people just let us.”

    You are absolutely correct to a point. Your choice to drink heavily doesn’t mean that the rest of society should have to accept any short comings on your part as a result (being late or absent from work, driving drunk etc.).

    More importantly you are failing to recognize the difference between a “heavy drinker” and a true “alcoholic”. The “big book” of AA (and the group as a whole) are pretty clear there is a difference.

    A heavy drinker chooses to imbibe and has the ability to exert control when they want to. A true alcoholic has what is referred to in AA as an ‘allergy’ (meaning the body reacts in an adverse or abnormal way when exposed to something).

    That’s the major difference. A true alcoholic experiences the the phenomenon of craving (the abnormal reaction) whereas a heavy drinker does not (as most people can have a drink without immediately craving another after another). THAT is the reason for the ‘powelessness’ and reason for abstinence.

    For me personally I am an alcoholic. I not capable of having ‘just one’. I drink every day or not at all. There is no in between regardless of consequences. And for the record I’m not currently in AA (probably should be but I have a bit of a love/hate relationship there) and am what is considered to be a ‘functional alcoholic’. IE: I’m a woman who knocks back a 12-15 pack of beer every night but still manages to drag her ass to work (a mid level complex job, not some minimum wage convenience/retail job) more often than not.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. As to the cult/religion aspect…again, do your research. AA does not advertise or recruit. If you find yourself at a an AA meeting it’s because you sought them out and It’s not mandatory to attend even after becoming a member. They didn’t come find you and recruit you to attend or brainwash you into being there. Being powerless over alcohol doesn’t make you a zombie or powerless to choose whether you want to go to AA or not (or choose some other treatment).

    The ‘higher power’ part is simple addressing the fact that if you want to stop drinking but are unable to do it yourself then you need to find something bigger than yourself to help you. It’s a higher power of your choosing. For some it’s god, for some it’s the support of having a group of people to lean on who understand but it can be anything that inspires or empowers you to reach your goal.

    The steps and literature do refer to God a lot because at the time of its original writing Christianity was the primary religion of the writers/founders and the general area. But again, it’s a God of your choosing (IF you have a religious faith) or it can also be whatever your higher power is if you aren’t religious. The non-religious tend to use the reference of god as an acronym such as “good orderly decisions” or something similar (ie: to rely on better judgement or decision making that what got them in trouble in the first place).

    If you’re a heavy drinker as you say you are but don’t feel like you an alcoholic then by all means continue doing what you’re doing. But take some responsibility when posting things and do some actual research before posting things. Not everyone is in the same boat as you. AA is not for everyone but it does a lot of good for those that need it. Maybe your heavy drinking has prompted people to suggest it to you but you don’t feel like it’s for you. That’s fine. It may not be. Nobody’s forcing you. But trashing something that has helped many people because it’s not right for you, and possibly discouraging people who could benefit from it…is just plain irresponsible and treating people like they are sheep. Next time try writing something that shows both sides, pros and cons, so people can make an informed decision.

    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I went to AA for a year. I sat there the whole time thinking “this ISN’T how I am. These aren’t my problems!” I do believe there are some people that belong there, but I didn’t. If you can’t stop drinking once you start, you might need the program. If you only drink certain drinks uncontrollably, or, your a girl, and certain times of the month are more of a problem, you might just need control, LOL. I would order a Sex on the Beach, or a White Russian and it tasted SO good I would finish it before the waitress even left the table and then order another. I went from being sober to ddrruunnkk before I even knew it. My friend insisted that I go to AA. After a very embarrassing weekend I agreed. The particular group that I belonged to said “if you’ve ever had a drink and enjoyed it, you’re an alcoholic.”What?! I finally figured out that it didn’t matter if it was a sweet drink or a jolly rancher candy. Sugar was my problem. I don’t drink wine the same way I drink a really sugary mixed drink, so I NEVER order a drink that tastes like candy. As soon as I feel a buzz, I stop for awhile. I found that a buzz actually lasts a long time without being nursed. I also found that it’s the heart, not the brain that loves God. I do thank the program because it was my bridge to God. Loving Him doesn’t mean giving up fun and drink. It just means thinking things through, deciding if it’s beneficial to you or hurting others. I found that when you’re on the outside looking in, it seems like you are giving up fun stuff. Once your in, you realize it’s actually freedom from behaviors that are holding you back. I love being a Christian. I have FREEDOM and REAL fun more now than ever before. We never want to do something that will hurt someone else. If your drinking does that then stop, it’s not worth it! Really, what’s so good about drinking that it’s worth someone else’s pain. If YOU have pain God will help you through it IF you ask Him. You might have to give up drinking temporarily so that you have a clear head to take direction. The most important thing is to have a healthy relationship with God, a healthy mind, a healthy body, and healthy relationships. How is that brainwashing?

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    • Well if you feel happier now than you did when you were drinking that’s wonderful. Just don’t lay your standards and morals upon other people. I am a heavy drinker for 20 years now and still loving it. I despise how society treats decent and talented drinkers as if we are criminals. All through history it were the colorful drunk people who made our lives on Earth better, not the boring cunt next door who is the perfect neighbour cause you hardly notice him/her. Dare to live a little. Meet people, have some adventures.
      Cheers,
      Micky

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    • Madden, I went to AA for five years, and I never heard anyone say anything remotely like “if you’ve ever had a drink and enjoyed it, you’re an alcoholic.” That makes no sense. People in AA sometimes have their own take on things, it’s best to just ignore that and seek out someone who has been around for a while or just read the literature. But there are really hardly any hard and fast rules like that. What would be the point of having a drink if you didn’t enjoy it??? And YOU, not anyone else, decides if you have a problem or not.

      I’m not in AA anymore, but despite the fact that I’m atheist and could not stand the religious aspect of it, it helped me stop drinking at a time when that is what I wanted to do. It’s very much what Nicole stated above, it boiled down to something else to do in the evenings (!) and supportive people. You can really make AA into almost whatever you need, take what you need and leave the rest, as they say.

      What I dislike about AA is the religious aspect, and please don’t say “spiritual not religious” to me. That is hogwash. There are groups that say *the Lord’s Prayer* and it’s very hard to stand outside a group when you are feeling vulnerable. I believe also there was a Supreme Court ruling in the U.S. that stated AA was unmistakably a religious organization. I also dislike its total abstinence culture, which disdains any kind of harm reduction. It makes people sanctimonious, and if you break abstinence and take a drink you don’t just go, “Oh well, just a drink, it’s not the end of the world” – you tend to think “OMG! I broke sobriety, I might as well finish the bottle!”

      Like Micky our host here, I’m into people doing whatever makes them happy! There are far too many angry, sour faces around, too many people hating people and judging them, life is way too short and is more often than not more difficult than we expect, people should support each other and recognize we’re all humans stuck on this crazy journey. There, I’m becoming a philosopher in my old age! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Just a few points, AA is not a religious organization- it states so in its basic texts, usually read at every meeting. It’s in the big book. AA also encourages a person to find a relationship with a higher power of your own choosing. They promote no one particular faith. But to be fair, most people in the west are Christians and they’re annoying to those who are agnostic. AA has a chapter for agnostics, and are welcome too. Nobody in AA makes anybody stop drinking, it’s a self diagnosis. Only a true alcoholic can find this out for themselves. But if you truly come to find you are a real alcoholic, abstinence is key to clear the fog from the brain, get over the withdrawls of alcohol, do the steps and return to a productive life. No one in AA wants to ruin anyone’s fun or expect the rest of the world to stop drinking just because AA’ers do. Though it may seem that way from some of the stodgy big book thumpers. Every group has them. Please do carry on, and have a drink on me. Cheers!

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